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 Table of Contents  
CASE STUDY
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 40-42

Side effects of Covishield vaccine on COVID-positive history family in India


1 Department of Electrical Engineering, PVG's College of Engineering and Technology, Pune, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Physics, Nowrosjee Wadia College, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Date of Submission18-Feb-2022
Date of Decision28-Mar-2022
Date of Acceptance28-Mar-2022
Date of Web Publication17-Jun-2022

Correspondence Address:
Parikshit Gautam Jamdade
Below Canal, Near Ganpati Temple, Karvenagar, Pune, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/wjsi.wjsi_2_22

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  Abstract 


In India, COVID-19 vaccination was carried out in a phased manner from January 16, 2021, with Covishield. This study was carried out in Pune, Maharashtra, India, where COVID-positive history family who had taken the first dose of the Covishield vaccine were followed up to check for any side effects post vaccination. The data were collected with a participant-administered questionnaire. The predominant side effects reported were malaise, headache, fatigue, sneezing, nausea, and chills in participants, followed by pyrexia (fever) with a sore throat, while the most uncommon side effect seen is insomnia. The side effects were started at 6–8 h post vaccination, while it takes an average duration of 24–100 h to last. The absence of serious side effects makes the Covidshield vaccine safe for use in COVID-positive history population.

Keywords: COVID-19 virus, Covishield, side effects, vaccination, vaccines


How to cite this article:
Jamdade PG, Jamdade SG. Side effects of Covishield vaccine on COVID-positive history family in India. World J Surg Infect 2022;1:40-2

How to cite this URL:
Jamdade PG, Jamdade SG. Side effects of Covishield vaccine on COVID-positive history family in India. World J Surg Infect [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Dec 9];1:40-2. Available from: https://www.worldsurginfect.com/text.asp?2022/1/1/40/347766




  Introduction Top


We know that adverse side effects were seen in the non-COVID history population, and most studies are based on these while a lower number of studies are performed on the COVID history population. COVID-19 virus mostly affects the alveolar Type II cells and causes apoptosis, cellular damage, and altered production of the pulmonary surfactant.[1],[2] Owing to its high infectivity, social distancing and masks are being advocated to curb its spread with vaccination. Vaccination helps to develop the immune system by producing antibodies to fight against any infection and reduces the severity of the infection and lowers the chances of getting hospitalized due to the COVID-19 infection. Currently, more than 200 vaccines are underdevelopment against COVID-19 worldwide including mRNA, replicating or non-replicating viral-vectored vaccines, DNA vaccines, autologous dendritic cell-based vaccines, and an inactivated-virus vaccine.[3],[4],[5],[6]

The Covishield vaccine was approved to use by the Drugs Controller General of India on January 3, 21, to fight COVID-19 infection. The Covishield is developed by Serum Institute of India, Pune, with the help of Jenner Institute, University of Oxford, UK. It is a viral-vectored vaccine. Covishield had undergone trials in the UK, Brazil, and South Africa. It showed that the spike-specific T-cell was produced (peak) on day 14 and immunoglobulin G response by day 28, and was boosted following the second dose. Neutralizing antibodies were found in 86%–91% after a single dose and 100% after the second dose of the vaccine.[7],[8],[9],[10] In India, vaccination started January 16, 2021, onward in phases. Initially, health-care workers were vaccinated with either Covishield vaccine. In India, vaccination is given by developing priority groups. The central government of India had taken vaccination responsibility of 45-year-old age population, while the state government had taken the responsibility of population having age below 45 years. Nearly a total of 2499 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccines were already given in India. More than 469 million people have received two doses of the vaccine and are fully vaccinated.

METHODS

In this study, we have highlighted the side effects due to the Covishield vaccine on COVID history family post vaccination having different age groups located in Pune, India, to document the adverse side effects on post-Covishield vaccination. The participants were administered the first dose of the Covishield vaccine. All family members received the standard therapy including hydroxychloroquine sulfate (400 mg daily), doxycycline (200 mg daily), ivermectin (3 mg daily), Omez (20 mg daily), and Zincovit (850 mg daily). There were three participants in the family having age 43, 50, and 78 years. They all were COVID positive and recovered from it.


  Results Top


After taking the vaccine, there were no admissions to the hospital, and serious side effects were observed for over a week. The predominant side effects reported were malaise, headache, fatigue, sneezing, nausea, and chills in participants, followed by pyrexia (fever) with a sore throat, while the most uncommon side effect seen is insomnia. The average duration in the studied family for insomnia, pyrexia (fever), malaise, headache, fatigue, sneezing, nausea, chills, sweating, cough, cold, sore throat, and running nose is 24, 24, 24, 10, 24, 80, 24, 20, 16, 16, 12, 56, and 24, respectively, in hours. None of the side effects lasted for more than 100 h in any individual. Most of these side effects had their onset after a period of 6–10 h and lasted for approximately the period of 24–100 h. To overcome these side effects post vaccination, in India, they prescribe to take paracetamol. Paracetamol is good to reduce fever but not for other side effects. These side effects are expected which can indicate that the vaccine is working to develop immunization.

We also noted that COVID-positive history family after recovery from COVID-19 are facing few medical problems. These problems are reduced post vaccination, indicating that vaccination is very important not only for non-COVID but also for the positive-COVID population. Medical problems before and reduced after vaccination are mentioned in [Table 1]. In [Table 1], the percentage indicates the duration of the symptoms/medical problem hours reduced in the COVID-positive history family.
Table 1: Condition associated with COVID history population - pre vaccination and post vaccination

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  Conclusion Top


Side effects of the Covishield vaccine are moderate in frequency, mild in severity, and short term. The predominant side effects reported were malaise, headache, fatigue, sneezing, nausea, and chills in participants, followed by pyrexia (fever) with a sore throat, while the most uncommon side effect seen is insomnia. The side effects were started at 6–8 h post vaccination, while it takes an average duration of 24–72 h to last. The absence of serious side effects does not affect the daily activities of COVID history populations which is the highlight of the study. Our study has tried to address the concerns about the safety of the Covishield vaccine in COVID history populations.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Sharma O, Sultan AA, Ding H, Triggle CR. A review of the progress and challenges of developing a vaccine for COVID-19. Front Immunol 2020;11:585354.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Schousboe P, Wiese L, Heiring C, Verder H, Poorisrisak P, Verder P, et al. Assessment of pulmonary surfactant in COVID-19 patients. Crit Care 2020;24:552.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
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Murphy KR, Patel NC, Ein D, Hudelson M, Kodoth S, Marshall GD Jr., et al. Insights from American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology COVID-19 vaccine task force: Allergic reactions to mRNA SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2021;126:319-20.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
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Kurup D, Schnell MJ. SARS-CoV-2 vaccines – The biggest medical research project of the 21st century. Curr Opin Virol 2021;49:52-7.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
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Mason RJ. Pathogenesis of COVID-19 from a cell biology perspective. Eur Respir J 2020;55:2000607.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
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Turner PJ, Ansotegui IJ, Campbell DE, Cardona V, Ebisawa M, El-Gamal Y, et al. COVID-19 vaccine-associated anaphylaxis: A statement of the World Allergy Organization Anaphylaxis Committee. World Allergy Organ J 2021;14:100517.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
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Gautam Jamdade P, Gautamrao Jamdade S. Modeling and prediction of COVID-19 spread in the Philippines by October 13, 2020, by using the VARMAX time series method with preventive measures. Results Phys 2021;20:103694.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
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  [Full text]  
10.
Sah R, Shrestha S, Mehta R, Sah SK, Rabaan AA, Dhama K, et al. AZD1222 (Covishield) vaccination for COVID-19: Experiences, challenges, and solutions in Nepal. Travel Med Infect Dis 2021;40:101989.  Back to cited text no. 10
    



 
 
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